Dr. Dre
8.17.2015

Dr. Dre’s ‘Compton’ Debuts at No. 2

Not only did Straight Outta Compton put up big numbers at the box office, the companion album also makes a big debut this week. Dr. Dre’s Compton: A Soundtrack by Dr. Dre, inspired by the N.W.A biopic, opens at No. 2 on the Billboard 200 this week.

According to Billboard, Dre’s first album in 16 years sold 295,000 equivalent album units, with 276,000 of them pure album sales. Compton also debuts at No. 1 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart, Dre’s third chart-topper on that list.

Dre’s previous album, 2001, was released in 1999 and spent four non-consecutive weeks at No. 2. His debut, 1993’s The Chronic, peaked at No. 3 and held the spot for six non-consecutive weeks.

Released through Aftermath/Interscope Records, Compton—which boasts appearances from Eminem, Ice Cube, Kendrick Lamar, and Snoop Dogg—is exclusive to Apple Music and iTunes for its first two weeks of release.

Meanwhile, the F. Gary Gray-directed film opened with $56.1 million at the box office over the weekend, becoming the biggest August opening ever for an R-rated film.

Another big debut topped the charts—country singer Luke Bryan grabbed his third No. 1 album with Kill the Lights, which sold 345,000 equivalent album units. It’s the strongest week for the charts in a while and the first week in eight months where two albums have both sold more than 275,000 copies.

Rounding out the charts are the Now 55 compilation—No. 3 with 76,000 units—and Christian group tobyMac’s This Is Not a Test, at No. 4 with 38,000 units. Future’s DS2 slides 2-7 with 31,000, while Drake’s If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late remains at No. 10 (21,000).

Billboard 200 Top 10

1. Luke Bryant – Kill the Lights – 345,000
2. Dr. Dre  – Compton: A Soundtrack by Dr. Dre – 295,000
3. Now 55 – 76,000
4. tobyMac – This Is Not a Test – 38,000
5. Taylor Swift – 1989 – 33,000
6. Ed Sheeran – x – 33,000
7. Future – DS2 – 31,000
8. Descendants Soundtrack – 30,000
9. Sam Hunt – Montevallo – 27,000
10. Drake – If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late – 21,000