2.2.2016

Tinashe Heats Up Complex

Thirst trap alert. Tinashe graces the February/March 2016 cover of Complex in what could be her sexiest shoot yet.

“This is definitely a racy photo shoot,” the “Player” singer told the magazine. “This is probably one of my racier ones. The only other one that could rival this shoot is my Playboy shoot but I think this one’s actually hotter.”

Tinashe

Tinashe Covers Complex

Tinashe, who’s readying her sophomore album Joyride, whets appetites with the eye-popping pics—she sips from a crazy straw (while showing underboob), drifts in a punch bowl, and climbs out of a glass of ice water.

“With this cover in particular, as opposed to others that I’ve done in the past, I definitely had a little bit more fun, which was cool,” she said. “We got to shoot some stuff that was really colorful and lighthearted. I had a little bit more creative control than I normally have so I had a really, really great time on this shoot.”

See more from the revealing shoot and read highlights from the story below.

On the status of Joyride: “I would’ve said 95 percent, but now I’m going back to 80 percent. Rethinking some things in the 11th hour.”

On recording the album in her childhood bedroom: “It’s a place for my solitude. I’m very comfortable here. I can be pure inspiration here, and not be affected by any other factor, whether that’s a producer or anyone else’s opinion. It also makes me feel like I’m the same person I was before I had any level of success, which was when I was the most inspired creatively.”

On not having a Plan B: “I have no Plan B. I’ve set this up so that my entire life is based on this, and if this fails I have nothing else. No career options. No life options. I’ve sacrificed so much for this; failure is so beyond an option. There can only be setbacks. It’ll eventually work because it can’t not work. And it’s never a fully hopeless situation, because I’ll always have some support.”

On songwriting: “I matured faster. I’ve always been able to tap into the storytelling aspect of writing. As an artist you’re allowed to create stories that aren’t so literal to your life. I’m able to take stories that my friends have gone through, things I’ve witnessed, secondhand accounts, and narrate that.”

On her busy schedule: “I’m not a big fan of downtime. I have too much time to think.” About what? She scoffs, like it should be obvious. “That I’m not doing enough. That I’m not good enough. That I’m wasting my time.”

On middle school challenges: “When I was in middle school and everybody didn’t like me. I’d wonder, ‘What am I doing wrong?’ Because it’s hard not to feel like it’s a reflection of what I’m doing wrong. You have to try to remember that that’s not always the case. That it’s not always a reflection on you.”

On high school dating struggles: “Nobody wanted to fuck with me. As far as the guys go, nobody wanted to like me or date me. They’d talk to me in secret and then at school they’d ignore me. Literally ignore me to my face. And psychologically that messes with you. It makes you feel that you must be genuinely unattractive if this person doesn’t want anyone to know that you even talk. That’s bad.”